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28/03/20

We are working on it ☺️

28/03/20

Lovely to hear from you, Kate. Pleased to say we are working on this 😊 https://t.co/pjCw5UfiqK

25/03/20

Yes, ’s lunches are hard to beat. Missed by all https://t.co/d76Ciz78s1

25/03/20

Such an important point , glad we are all finding ways to replace the conversations we miss - whether a quick 'catch up' outside a classroom or learning in lessons 😁 https://t.co/aCBlApL9dp

25/03/20

A real team effort, ! Her desk set-up is an inspiration to us all 😍 https://t.co/5fAV6XJS7K

25/03/20

Awesome work! Good to see clubs going online! https://t.co/PDgR9h4w4k

25/03/20

Retweeted From BHS Junior English

https://t.co/XtDNCyzCj5

25/03/20

Thank you - we love hearing stories like this! https://t.co/kWCjVuQQhE

24/03/20

Brilliant work all around 🤗 https://t.co/kj9EvJwFnm

24/03/20

Great to hear! Keep up the good work Mrs M! 🤹‍♀️ https://t.co/YKGdp5I6gj

24/03/20

Retweeted From BlackheathHigh Sport

Year 5 learning all about the Components of Fitness 🏋🏼‍♀️ home circuits being created and performed! Yes keep up the great work 👊🏻👌👍 https://t.co/HxjqR7ZL0s

24/03/20

Thank you Audible! https://t.co/xxxXJGotVp

23/03/20

Brilliant to hear 🙂 https://t.co/zB1P4DGPsy

23/03/20

Absolutely brilliant - keep up the good work everyone! https://t.co/O7T7LIw4aW

23/03/20

Clearly the exercise is doing the trick - they look so spritely!

23/03/20

and at home! https://t.co/x9uA3evOkV

23/03/20

Great to see students of key workers keeping fit at school... https://t.co/ihyD8aS6kL

20/03/20

A reminder to everyone 😊 https://t.co/PzwnYRBjPN

20/03/20

We are now continuing our girls’ education through our Guided Home Learning method for all students and the Blackheath High School buildings are now closed except to provide critical support to our incredible key workers. https://t.co/3q27u3Hz22

20/03/20

We couldn’t agree more! https://t.co/VPOaqnDFef

20/03/20

Retweeted From Sarah Skevington

If you needed any more encouragement to look at this experiment . Wiping slices of white bread with clean hands, iPads, unwashed hands etc and see what happens 😱 https://t.co/TVYNpLCnkS

20/03/20

We are all so grateful and proud of our community in these challenging times, keep it up! https://t.co/gEdtLrVZZf

18/03/20

❤️ https://t.co/jgNu4oyV4D

18/03/20

Retweeted From Steven Henderson

Guided Home Learning provision starts from tomorrow. Students: remember to use Firefly and email if not in school. Looking forward to seeing you either in school or on-line tomorrow.

18/03/20

Retweeted From BlackheathHigh Sport

GREASE LIGHTNING 💃🏽✨ https://t.co/QgLCHk1o6a

13/03/20

Retweeted From Natalie Argile

Another STEAM week, another ‘Masters’ class for staff. Thanks to Mr Masters for giving up his time to teach us to draw! https://t.co/47XSoKWDb7

13/03/20

Quite a treat to have a surprise flash mob appear in reception today, featuring the BHS invention, the Boghorn! https://t.co/q923mn1grk

13/03/20

Sixth Form had a great Skype conversion with analytical research assistant , where they learnt about her role of analysing proteins in cancerous and normal tissues. Thank you Erin! https://t.co/si7uuFrPLp

13/03/20

What an excellent week of activities we had for this week! Including a CSI Day, virtual reality, making recyclable bunting and learning more about sustainability in the environment. https://t.co/ulbwDYQ37K

13/03/20

Retweeted From BlackheathHigh Sport

WAKE UP + WORK OUT 🏋🏽‍♀️🔥 come and join the fun! 7:30am Monday, Wednesday and Friday! https://t.co/VcaIxv75pN

12/03/20

Blackheath High Junior School in action 👏👏👏 https://t.co/32B8sXUKGK

11/03/20

Year 10 are hosting a Senior Citizen's tea party with an 'Under the Sea' theme today. Fabulous decorations and smiles all around! https://t.co/VhlsRJ0FPb

11/03/20

Retweeted From Rebecca Richards 🧪

Making electronic quizzes with . Some excellent (and tricky) questions. I will hang my certificate from Mia and Katie up with pride (I didn’t know pizza originated in Greece!) https://t.co/ZEiuYpeRDi

11/03/20

It was a pleasure to welcome alumna back to school today to talk to Year 7 about her career as a journalist, give tips on interview technique and provide insight into the news that surrounds us. Thank you, Geraldine! https://t.co/3FO5ecoI2Z

11/03/20

Thank you so much for coming in and kick-starting Year 7's Journalism Day! https://t.co/xHJVHPl1XP

11/03/20

Entry for Year 11 Crime Scene Investigators only ⛔️🧪🔎 https://t.co/dIaBTfOt8V

11/03/20

The Mighty Boghorn returns! https://t.co/Qei6U3Uhyn

11/03/20

Retweeted From Blackheath Science

British Science Week is here! We're so excited https://t.co/pOsLIsypqS

Mental wellbeing

Promoting good physical health should be straightforward; we know that we need to eat well, take exercise regularly and drink plenty of water. When it comes to mental health, however, we tend not to think about it until a problem develops. According to a recent article in The Guardian, this is a strategy that has been disastrous for an entire generation of British people (and in particular those under the age of 25).

A person’s mental health cannot be seen and there is still a significant stigma attached to discussing mental health problems; this is something that we are working hard to change in school.

Statistics tell us that one in four people in the UK will experience a mental illness each year. Yet we all have a brain and, therefore, a mental health. Surely, all of us should give consideration to how we might make lifestyle choices, and create an environment and society which is conducive to good mental health for everyone?

The mind: a school/home approach

We use PSHE in school to discuss a range of issues including body image, bullying, friendship - and a range of wellbeing issues that encourage our students to develop coping strategies that will stand them in good stead as they get older.

PSHE is only one part of the toolkit that we have to promote positive mental health. A really important approach that teachers and parents can take is to drop into casual conversations is that it is OK not to be OK. In Biology lessons, we can discuss mental health when we learn about how the brain functions, in English we can touch upon an author’s mental state, in PSHE we can discuss the treatment of people with mental illness within the legal system.

Over dinner with our children we can talk about how we are coping with life’s difficulties. By consistently and casually mentioning a topic, we take away some of the scariness and more importantly some of the stigma that stops students from asking for help when they are struggling.

The body: incorporate more physical activity

Young people need to move regularly in order to think clearly. They simply aren’t designed to be trapped in a small room with a smart phone for hours on end having information thrown at them all day. In addition, a sedentary lifestyle is terrible for our mental health, since the body and the brain work in tandem.

Encourage your daughter to get out at the weekend. Put the phone away for a couple of hours and go for a walk together. At school we encourage students to get involved with the co-curricular programme - from Sports to Spanish Dancing there are lots of opportunities for the girls to throw themselves into physical activity.

The soul: encourage open communication

Technological advances mean there is the biggest gap in cultural understanding between adults (parents and teachers) and children since the 1960s. We must try to bridge the 'us and them' divide because communication is key to good mental health. For parents and teachers to have an open and honest dialogue with our children, we must understand their world and what is important to them.

Help young people find their passion and give them a healthy way to express themselves. Everyone needs a creative outlet, something which lets them release difficult feelings, perhaps through sport, art, music or drama. If we have this, we’re far less likely to express ourselves in more harmful ways.

We really try to encourage this at school through form time activities and through lessons. Blackheath High students are very socially aware and when they get involved with Community Projects and Charity Work they tend to be far less introspective – just look at the enthusiasm for collecting food for the local Salvation Army Food Bank recently.

A study by Professor Rachel Thompson in 2013 found young people see social media as more “real” than their three dimensional existences at home and at school. By immersing ourselves in their world, we give ourselves the tools to help them combat the worst aspects of the web and embrace the best. Most importantly, we can show them that not everything on the internet is real, and that there is a very real world at their fingertips.

The evidence shows that our daily habits have the most effect on our wellbeing; a little and often approach is what works best. Lots of conversations with the girls; allowing them to solve minor problems on their own gives them the strength to deal with big challenges as they get older; incorporating simple changes into the day, where we talk about mental health in the same way that we talk about physical health, not only impacts students, it can also have a profound positive impact on all of us – teachers and parents - too.

Useful Apps

Headspace


Headspace is a digital service that provides guided meditation sessions and mindfulness training. Its content can be accessed online, or via their mobile apps. Headspace have had over 16 million people using the app.

BellyBio

Free app that teaches a deep breathing technique useful in fighting anxiety and stress. A simple interface uses biofeedback to monitor your breathing. Sounds cascade with the movements of your belly, in rhythms reminiscent of waves on a beach. Charts also let you know how you’re doing. A great tool when you need to slow down and breathe.

eCBT Calm

Provides a set of tools to help you evaluate personal stress and anxiety, challenge distorted thoughts, and learn relaxation skills that have been scientifically validated in research on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Lots of background and useful information along with step-by-step guides.

Optimism  

Track your moods, keep a journal, and chart your recovery progress with this comprehensive tool for anxiety. One of the most popular mood tracking apps available, with plenty of features.

iSleepEasy

A calm female voice helps you quell anxieties and take the time to relax and sleep, in an array of guided meditations. Separately controlled voice and music tracks, flexible lengths, and an alarm. Includes a special wee hours rescue track, and tips for falling asleep.

Magic Window

Living Pictures - Not technically a mental health app, it makes no miraculous claims about curbing anxiety. However, there is independent research indicating that taking breaks and getting exposure to nature, even in videos, can reduce stress. This app offers an assortment of peaceful, ambient nature scenes from beautiful spots around the world.

Relax Melodies

A popular free relaxation sound and music app. Mix and match nature sounds with new age music; it’s lovely to listen to birds in the rain while a piano softly plays.

The Positive Schools Programme

We believe staff and students are best able to flourish when they are mentally and physically healthy. Blackheath High is leading the way in the pioneering Positive Schools Programme (PSP) within the Girls' Day School Trust (GDST). Drawing from neuroscience and psychology, PSP teaches us to better understand our behaviour, moods and feelings. The digital toolkit helps develop emotional resilience and provides the tools and techniques to manage stress, change and pressure. This includes the ‘emotional barometer’ which is used to manage feelings. 

To find out more about PSP, please visit the Positive website.